Core Beliefs

corebeliefs2

Our ideas for what defines fitness & health have evolved over the years.  This is what we have come to believe works best for long term

Be as consistent as possible with exercise, sleep, clean nutrition & recovery 
As Bruce Lee said “long term consistency trumps short term intensity.”  Be active everyday. Some days will be hard days (i.e training days) and some are easy recovery days (lower intensity hike, swim, bike, yoga etc).

Respect Recovery
Lower intensity days are critical in allowing your body to recharge and get stronger. If you beat yourself into the ground day in day out you might feel accomplished at the time but you will eventually loose fitness and health over the long term.  There is no perfect prescription of hard days to easy days. Experiment with 1 day on 1 day off and be intuitive to how you are feeling on a daily basis. We have seen members get amazing results & performance gains with 2-3 training days a week mixed with some yoga or walking on the off days.  More hard exercise is NOT better. 

Food Matters
All the craziest transformations we have seen at the gym have come as a result of cleaning up nutrition combined with better exercise habits. You can’t out exercise poor nutrition.

For Optimum Health… slow down, simplify & reduce external life stress
Stress is stress and the body does not differentiate stress induced from exercise and stress induced from life (work, family, financial, etc). Being constantly stressed leads to poor lifestyle choices and poor general health. It would be advised to find ways to minimize that life stress. Simplify, prioritize, take time off, unplug… etc. Easier said than done (we know!), but it is worth mentioning if you are truly interested in improving your overall health and body composition. Don’t let a missed training day, bad night sleep, or a less than stellar nutrition choice stress you out. Things happen… it’s called life. Stop beating yourself up!

Respect the Movement, Respect the Weight, then and only then put focus on the clock
In our opinion, the biggest downfall to Crossfit is likely the clock… (in combination with ego/competitiveness). The clock can be a great motivator but often that comes at a hefty price of poor movement patterns. Instead of focusing on how quickly you can move, focus on safely challenging your current ability and doing each and every rep well. At CFCA, finishing the workout is always secondary to doing challenging movements well. Form – then weight – then time….every time.

Realistically Define Yourself
Who are you?  Where are you now with your health/fitness?  Where do you want to be?  How do you define success?….Longevity? Durability/Injury Proof? Competition?  These are big questions to think about that will certainly tweak the direction of your training. Honest self assessment here is absolutely critical!

Don’t Over Think It
There are a lot of opinions out there regarding all things health & nutrition. Keep it simple & keep it fun.  “A designer knows he has achieved perfection not when there is nothing left to add, but when there is nothing left to take away”  Antoine de Saint-Exupery

Experiment 
We all come from different genetics, athletic backgrounds, personalities, work ethics, competitiveness… etc. Experiment and find what works best for you and listen to the signals your body is sending you. Be willing to put yourself out there and try new things (exercises/sports). Think about your fitness/health from a whole life, big picture perspective… go beyond just showing up to the gym.

Good Words to Ponder
“Humans are not physically normal in the absence of hard physical effort. Exercise is not a thing we do to fix a problem – it is a thing we must do anyway, a thing without which there will always be problems. Exercise is the thing we must do to replicate the conditions under which our physiology was adapted, the conditions under which we are physically normal. In other words, exercise is substitute cave-man activity – the thing we need to make our bodies and in fact our minds normal in the 21st century.” Mark Rippetoe